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Lypo-Solve

Ca+D3 Calcium with Vitamin D

$25.75

Availability: In stock

SKU: CA001

Bone health, neural & immune function.


Hone your bone. It is critical that weight loss patients get their daily amount of calcium for bone health, and for well-being. For life!



  • 1,500 IU calcium citrate (362 mg calcium) 

  • 1,600 IU vitamin D3

  • Additional minerals

Details

Calcium citrate and vitamin D3

Decreased dietary intake of calcium and vitamin D-rich foods, and extreme weight loss alone, may increase bone turnover and lead to loss of bone. It is crucial that bariatric patients get daily adequate calcium to reduce the risk of bone loss, and for well-being…. for life!

The ASMBS*, The Obesity Society and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists suggest supplementing with 1,500 to 2,000 of calcium citrate a day with at least 400 IU of vitamin D. To meet these guidelines and to minimize pill intake, VITALEPH distributed 2,600 IU of vitamin D among two products, as follows:

  • 1,000 IU in VITALEPH Bariatric Multivitamin
  • 1,600 IU in Ca+D3

For a better absorption, take 1 capsule of Ca+D3 at a time, at least 2 hours apart from VITALEPH Bariatric Multivitamin.

CALCIUM

Calcium is well known for its role in building and maintaining strong bones and teeth. The body also needs calcium for muscles to move, for nerves to carry messages between the brain and every body part, to help blood vessels move blood throughout the body, and to help release hormones and enzymes that affect almost every function in the human body.

Calcium citrate is well absorbed on an empty stomach and does not cause constipation. After weight loss surgery, the preferred form of calcium supplementation is calcium citrate, which is more effectively absorbed than calcium carbonate. Other factors to consider, related to calcium absorption, are:

  • Caffeine increases calcium lost in the urine. Limit yourself to two cups of caffeinated coffee and caffeinated sources, such as soda and chocolate.
  • Excess sodium increases calcium excretion. Reduce your sodium intake from diet. Sodium is mostly found in processed foods and table salt.
  • Take calcium supplements separately from iron or zinc for a better absorption.
  • Calcium decreases the absorption of certain drugs (bisphosphonates, thyroid, some antibiotics).
  • Other drugs can increase calcium needs (corticosteroids, some diuretics).
  • Physical activity, such as weight-bearing exercise helps build bone mass.
  • Reducing phosphoric acid (found in sodas) and alcohol are important additional measures in the pursuit of strong and healthy bones. 

VITAMIN D

While known for its role in building bones and keeping them strong, the exact function of vitamin D in other cells and organs is not fully known; but plays a role in nerve, muscle, inflammation and immune function. Every single cell of your body needs vitamin D!
Vitamin D, considered both a hormone and a vitamin, is already a health concern in the US population. Studies have found that 60% to 80% of morbidly obese preoperative candidates already have vitamin D insufficiency. 

If left unattended, it would only be a matter of time before vitamin D and calcium deficiencies and hormonal mechanisms would result in osteopenia, osteoporosis, and ultimately, osteomalacia (extreme bone breakdown). 

*AMSBS. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery 


QUALITY MATTERS

ONLY GOOD STUFF ALLOWED.

It's not only about what is in the formula, but what we have avoided.

We pay special attention to avoid heavy metals, fillers, binders, glues, colors, flow agents, aluminum, hydrogenated oils, cornstarch, artificial flavorings and colorings, sweeteners, stimulants, sugar or high fructose corn syrup. We need your help to live a glyph-free life, learn how.

It is important to review your medications with your primary physician. This information may not cover all possible claims, uses, actions, precautions, side effects or interactions. It is not intended as medical advice, and should not be relied upon as a substitute for professional medical advice.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

References:
L. Aills et al. / Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases 4 (2008) S73-S108
Golder WS, O’Dorsio TM, Dillon JS, Mason EE. Severe metabolic bone disease as a long-term complication of obesity surgery. Obes Surg 2002;12:685–92. 
Margolis KL, Ray RM, Van Horn L, et al. Effect of calcium and vitamin D supplementation on blood pressure: the Women's Health Initiative Randomized Trial. Hypertension 2008;52:847-55.
Baron JA, Beach M, Mandel JS, et al. Calcium supplements for the prevention of colorectal adenomas. N Engl J Med. 1999;340:101-107.
Lappe JM, Travers-Gustafson D, Davies KM, et al. Vitamin D and calcium supplementation reduces cancer risk: results of a randomized trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007;85:1586–1591.
Office of Dietary Supplements. Dietary supplement fact sheet: calcium. Accessed at http://dietary-supplements.info.nih.gov/factsheets/calcium.asp March 3rd, 2014
Ross AC, Taylor CL, Yakine AL, Del Valle HB (eds); Committee to Review Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin D and Calcium; Institutes of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D. Washington DC: National Academies Press; 2010
Holick MF. Vitamin D: Physiology, Molecular Biology, and Clinical Applications. Totowa, NJ: Humana Press; 1999.
Goode LR, Brolin RE, Chowdhury HA, Shapses SA. Bone and gastric bypass surgery: effects of dietary calcium and vitamin D. Obes Res. 2004;12:40-47. 

 

 

 

 

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